❮Reading❯ ➽ A Cup of Light Author Nicole Mones – Motyourdrive.co.uk

A Cup of Light files A Cup of Light, read online A Cup of Light, free A Cup of Light, free A Cup of Light, A Cup of Light 86beca36a As An American Appraiser Of Fine Chinese Porcelain, Lia Frank Holds Fragile Beauty In Her Hands, Examines Priceless Treasure With A Magnifying Lens But When Lia Looks In The Mirror, She Sees The Flaws In Herself, A Woman Wary Of Love, Cut Off From The World Around Her Still, When She Is Sent To Beijing To Authenticate A Collection Of Rare Pieces, Lia Will Find Herself Changing In Surprising Ways Coming Alive In The Shadow Of An Astounding Mystery As Lia Evaluates Each Fragile Pot, She Must Answer Questions That Will Reverberate Through Dozens Of Lives Where Did These Works Of Art Come From Are They Truly Authentic Or Are They Impossibly Beautiful Forgeries Part Of The Perilous Underworld Of Chinese Art As Lia Examines Her Treasure, A Breathtaking Mystery Unravels Around Her And With Political Intrigue Intruding On Her World Of Provenance And Beauty, Lia Is Drawn Into Another, Personal Drama A Love Affair That Could Alter The Course Of Her Life


10 thoughts on “A Cup of Light

  1. says:

    What a great book I never knew about chinese porcelain cups, but they are a whole world unto themselves They are incredibly valuable, but there are also many fakes fang gu that are difficult to spot The main character is a chinese cup expert, and her descriptions and her fascination with the cups are contagious She is assigned to review the contents of a recently found collection that contains the most exquisite cups she has ever seen, with the finest, tiniest paintings and unique porcelain shades She is also deaf and wears hearing aids Taking her aids out and having the world silent is a reprieve for her, a relief actually I was actually envious and almost wondering what the perfect silence would be like There is also romance, the mystery of where the cup collection came from, and the shady Chinese underworld of art smuggling and peddling forgeries There are a couple undeveloped storylines, like one about a Silicon Valley Chinese American gazillionaire interested in buying the cups We just learn very little about him, and I wonder why his stories and others were included Hopefully my book club will explain the deeper meaning to me Also, there are too many characters to manage and keep straight I was mainly interested in the couple of primary characters But other than these very minor criticisms, this is basically a perfect novel UPDATE As I reflect on this book over the years, I realize it deserves the final 5th star It is a truly great book that will stay with you long after you finish it Plus, major kudos to Ms Mones for liking my review recently I totally appreciate authors who like their readers


  2. says:

    Lia Frank travels to Beijing to appraise a hoard of old Chinese porcelain, about to be sold to a foreign buyer The plot is fractured along narrative fault lines including Lia, her soon to be love interest Michael, the Chinese businessman Gao Yideng brokering the deal, Potter Yu who makes the best fakes in China, middleman Pao, smuggler Bai, Curator Li, and historical interpolations involving the tracing of the hoard s journey through time Oh yes, and then there is the buyer, a billionaire Chinese American and his wife who are having difficulty conceiving a child and I presume are sublimating that inability by paying 125 million for all this porcelain And I m not sure I got them all.For me the problem lies in the fact that I don t end the book feeling like I really know any of these people, and what I do know sometimes isn t all that interesting Lia s preoccupation with clothes and looking feminine, where d that come from and who cares Michael s research into lead poisoning of children in China could have been an entirely different novel, instead of truncated and jammed in here Why is Pao so addicted to horse racing and what does that have to do with the price of Chenghua chicken cups on the world antique porcelain market Yu the Potter I would have loved to have spent time with but he comes and goes in a flash, existing mostly so Lia and Bai can meet up in his showroom and not know who each other are and what they are both up to Jack and Anna Yang, difficult to work up any sympathy for them, they can afford IVF or hell, just buy a child for probably a lot cheaper than 125 million.An unconvincing, uninvolving, almost even deliberately distancing novel I almost gave it two stars, but the descriptions of the porcelain deserve better They really are lovely So three.


  3. says:

    This book was my Introduction to Nicole Mones Or, at least, to her writing I shall search out her debut novel, Lost in Translation, and others she may have out there I was thoroughly entranced by this book.A Cup of Light is not a fast paced book it is a deliberately woven story I loved the two main characters, Lia and Michael I could definitely relate to Lia s deafness, and how she loves to remove her hearing aids to be enveloped in a cocoon of quiet where she can focus on her work, and also visit her memory files She has trained her memory, since childhood, to file everything away, and when she needs to find a particular memory, either of porcelain or anything else she has filed, she knows just were to find it.Lia Frank, an American who reads Chinese, but due to her deafness does not speak it well, is a highly gifted appraiser of Chinese porcelains She is sent to China by her employer with a companion to appraise several antique porcelains Her companion gets sick en route, and she ends up going alone, without the second set of eyes needed for such a task Most of the pieces are genuine, some are exquisite forgeries, and she must know the difference.Mones takes us into the world of porcelain, what makes it so beautiful, so rare, so beloved by emperors and collectors the world over When Lia goes into her memory files to help her decide which is real, which is fake, we get some absolutely fascinating tidbits of Chinese and porcelain history When she finds forgeries, even they are good enough, exquisite enough, to almost cause her pain This story is a tapestry woven from the lives of several people, primarily focusing on Lia The threads are brought in when needed, and by the end of the book, the tapestry is finished, beautiful, and worthy to hold A Cup of Light.


  4. says:

    like her other novels, this is an education in a novel the premise is that a fabulous cache of Chinese Imperial porcelains found somewhere, that has been previously uncatalogued, needs to be appraised a rather singular woman goes to do the job, and her knowledge is encyclopedic which means that i read this book with my computer ready to Google search every piece of porcelain she mentions, so i could actually see what a double gourd or wucai or a chicken cup looked like some may find this book a little too dense with its depth of porcelain lore, but if you re like me and enjoy novels that introduce a new world to you, especially in retelling history as human story, then this is a well written glimpse into the arcane and lucrative world of Chinese porcelain both its current trade and its rich lineage.


  5. says:

    I just finished this book and I was really impressed The book was written in way that served as a reflection of the story itself The book was about so many things, above all the history and artistry of Asian pottery The story unfolded as delicately and artfully as the ceramics themselves I found myself sipping the story, not wanting to rush, wanting to savor This was no action packed adventure Instead it was about the eternal and internal I haven t been moved to write to an author, personally, in a while, but I think it s time.


  6. says:

    I love everything this woman writes Everything Intense, expansive and wonderful novels set in Asia art, history, family, love Mones best was Lost in Translation, and I m hopeful she ll introduce a new one to rival its appeal soon It s been too long.


  7. says:

    This book was a sensual pleasure This second novel by the author of Lost in Translation is a wonderful mix of delighting the senses with art and with love Lia Frank, a porcelain expert for a high end auctioneers think Sothebys , flies to China to evaluate twenty pieces of porcelain her and her boss are given to understand are being offered quietly for sale by the Chinese government With a buyer already in place, Lia s job is to check the value, make sure there aren t any fakes in the mix, and try to work out where the porcelain comes from What she discovers on arrival is that there aren t twenty pieces, there are 800 pieces Staggered, astonished, Lia settles in for a much longer stay than she anticipated.Mones weaves Lia s knowledge of porcelain through the story like a fine, never ending banquet, as a reader, you truly drink from a cup of light and are enlightened I ll certainly never look at any good chinese porcelain the same way again An added twist is that Lia is deaf She wears hearing aids, but while she works she takes them out, and gives over all her other senses to the porcelain It speaks to her in a language only those who are willing to hear can understand.And while during the day Lia s senses and intellect are tested by the porcelain, at night she starts to get to know her neighbour in the little apartment block she is staying in, an American doctor and researcher, trying to come to grips with a divorce and the aftermath of cancer Lia opens herself to love, and takes a chance on finding happiness.At the same time, she wrestles with the problem of where so much porcelain has come from, and who is responsible for the few fakes she has found Fakes so beautiful, they are as worthy of credit as the originals they almost succeed in replicating The answers she finds will turn her ideas about forgery on their head.This novel manages to be sensual, intriguing and enlightening I loved it.


  8. says:

    I enjoyed this book because it wove so many strands together First, the lives of Lia, the art evaluator, Michael, a man cut off from himself due to illness, as well as bit players like Bia, Guo, Dr Zhang etc Then there is the art, which has a dimension and character of its own The Chenghua Chinese cup distills the uniqueness of a beautiful object and raises the pivotal question raised by Mones, what is fake, what is real And if fake is almost as good as real does that matter I liked that philosophical question beneath the bustle of Lia s work, the Chinese streets, the business side of the sale of a fantastic collection of art But it isn t the only question raised Selling art to other countries Wrong or right Are there nuances I think I loved the art the most though Lia was interesting and I enjoyed finding out about her, but getting to understanding porcelain a little was, for me, the best part I want to read by Mones.


  9. says:

    Another from Nicole Mones, which I read after The Last Chinese Chef This book, in particular, had a huge infuence my partner in Paris and I both read it and named our new company after a phrase in the book hoi moon, meaning when something is perfect or just right This time the background is Chinese porcelain and the primary character is a woman who flies to China to evaluate a collection of artwork up for sale The interesting love interest brings a perfect frisson of sensuality in human form to the story.


  10. says:

    A museum teacher friend with a love of Asian art loaned me this book, saying that it was beguiling, and it certainly is The style is clear and almost simple, the relationships complex and the story plays out luminously, like the Chinese porcelain that the novel is about I started it as a train book, something that I read on the train and keep in my backpack, but I soon began taking it out and reading it in bed at night too A wonderful novel


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