❮KINDLE❯ ❅ PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century ❂ Author John F. Moffitt – Motyourdrive.co.uk

PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century chapter 1 PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century, meaning PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century, genre PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century, book cover PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century, flies PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century, PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century 110c1c3c0048d While The Renaissance Is Generally Perceived To Be A Secular Movement, The Majority Of Large Artworks Executed In Th Century Italy Were From Ecclesiastical Commissions Because Of The Nature Of Primarily Basilica Plan Churches, A Parishioner S View Was Directed By The Diminishing Parallel Lines Formed By The Walls Of The Structure Appearing To Converge Upon A Mutual Point, This Resulted In An Artistic Phenomenon Known As The Vanishing Point As Applied To Ecclesiastical Artwork, The Catholic Vanishing Point CVP Was Deliberately Situated Upon Or Aligned With A Given Object Such As The Eucharist Wafer Or Host, The Head Of Christ Or The Womb Of The Virgin Mary Possessing Great Symbolic Significance In Roman Liturgy Masaccio S Fresco Painting Of The Trinity Circa In The Florentine Church Of Santa Maria Novella, Analyzed In Physical And Symbolic Detail, Provides The First Illustration Of A Consistently Employed Linear Perspective Within An Ecclesiastical Setting Leonardo S Last Supper, Venaziano S St Lucy Altarpiece, And Tome S Transparente Illustrate The Continuation Of This Use Of Liturgical Perspective


9 thoughts on “PAINTERLY PERSPECTIVE AND PIETY: Religious Uses of the Vanishing Point, from the 15th to the 18th Century

  1. says:

    I love this book because it supports my other reading, like rereading Frances Yates Yates is a romp and a harshly criticised scholar from the wild and wooly sixties, albeit that she was a very elderly contributer I sometimes wonder if she is so critiqued because she was female and a somewhat eccentric person, but never mind Painterly perspective is about a change in world view, as single point perspective was embraced by the artistic establishment in response to religious contracts We are no longer able to see a painting in the same way because we are all accustomed to the realism of perspective, and seemingly ignorant of the fact that our vision has been manipulated by a rational structure The single vanishing point is the photographic way of seeing the world, but has a controlling quality in the hands of the painter, especially in creating a vision rather than a reproduction Anyone interesting Alberti and the development of painting might enjoy this book, unless religion gives you a rash.The Epilogue to this book is an antimodernist screed Yet it makes very clear the potential problems of a post WWII geenration in trying to understand premodern preoccupations, such as the Renaissance and early modern history It s an imprtant work in understanding how technology makes a difference in hostorical perspective I don t necessarily agree with the autor sperspective but the book was publishe dposthumously, and who knows how much he would hav edited his conclusion All said and done, I am glad I have read this book because it clarified a historical shift in perspective.


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