[Reading] ➽ ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს By Bohumil Hrabal – Motyourdrive.co.uk


ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს explained ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს , review ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს , trailer ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს , box office ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს , analysis ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს , ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს 2f80

  • Paperback
  • 310 pages
  • ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს
  • Bohumil Hrabal
  • Georgian
  • 01 March 2019

About the Author: Bohumil Hrabal

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს book, this is one of the most wanted Bohumil Hrabal author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “ვემსახურებოდი ინგლისის მეფეს

  1. says:

    Czechs say Bohumil Hrabal s work is untranslatable When I read Too Loud a Solitude I indeed felt something wasn t coming through But I chalked it up to a style of Eastern European literature dark, allegorical, an unfiltered cigarette of protest to communist grime Glad I read it but no rush to read anyHrabal.And then I stopped in a used bookstore, just this week Monday There was I Served the King of England I jimmied it out and thumbed it open, expecting to read a sentence or two and Czechs say Bohumil Hrabal s work is untranslatable When I read Too Loud a Solitude I indeed felt something wasn t coming through But I chalked it up to a style of Eastern European literature dark, allegorical, an unfiltered cigarette of protest to communist grime Glad I read it but no rush to read anyHrabal.And then I stopped in a used bookstore, just this week Monday There was I Served the King of England I jimmied it out and thumbed it open, expecting to read a sentence or two and slide it back Instead I read this When I started to work at the Golden Prague Hotel, the boss took hold of my left ear, pulled me up, and said, You re a busboy here, so remember, you don t see anything and you don t hear anything Repeat what I just said So I said I wouldn t see anything and I wouldn t hear anything Then the boss pulled my right ear and said, But remember too that you ve got to see everything and hear everything That s how I began.I m only human So I took it home and rushed to finish what else I was reading I started Tuesday I followed Ditie, the busboy, from hotel to hotel From busboy to waiter I was always lucky in my bad luck, he said.I m trying to tell you about this in a way that will not be full of spoilers view spoiler Eventually the Germans come, first in the form of a lovely Nazi gym instructor She weds Ditie, but not before the high comedy of Ditie being examined by Nazi doctors to see if his sperm is acceptable Their superior blood child may be autistic What he does, and only does, is pound nails into the floor Ditie will hear them always Ditie survives the war, becomes a millionaire hotel owner By this point he has been a Nazi sympathizer and a beneficiary of commandeered Jewish property But somehow remains completely lovable The communists come and take it all away hide spoiler Well, I guess that didn t work.Instead, let me tell you one anecdote See, Ditie, as you can imagine, meets many different characters One is Mr ba, the soccer referee Nobody wanted to referee the Sparta Slavia match because the crowd always insulted the referee So Mr ba agreed to do it He practiced by running through the birch trees, reprimanding and threatening Burger and Braine with expulsion, but mostly yelling at Mr ha, Onetime and you re out of the game A headwaiter took a bus of inmates from an asylum, along with a barrel of beer, to watch That small story can not have anything but a happy ending._____ _____ _____ _____ _____Eventually, Ditie realizes this although the stars were visible at night, at noon you could see them only from the bottom of a deep well. So, like Murakami, he goes for introspection The book did not wane here._____ _____ _____ _____ _____See, I ve been doing this thing with reading friends, real life reading friends We meet sometime before Christmas, in some place that serves alcoholic beverages, and, in turn, announce our top ten books of the year list This started with two guys on bar napkins and no preparation, to seven, down to amanageable five, but with hand out typed lists Civility moderates Tonight, Thursday, was that night I was pretty satisfied with my list about a month ago Independent People had been on the bubble but then I read Mo Yan s Frog and I thought I was set But as the weeks passed, I weighed which books resonated most, and Iceland appeared to be the final journey But, as I said, I started I Served the King of England Tuesday By the time Ditie had to masturbate for the Nazi doctors Wednesday on my calendar , I had to see whether he passed the ethnic purity test I wasn t howling Just smiling on every page Who says Hrabal can t be translated So I woke this morning, 120 pages to go It could be the first book next year But readers, you know how it is.Iceland Sagas and Chinese one child policy novels would have to be runners up This was too good not to make the list How often do I give 5 stars

  2. says:

    Man s body and spirit are indestructiblehe is merely changed or metamorphized Bohumil Hrabal, I Served the King of England 1971.Hrabal s satirically political, erotically imagined and poignant adventure story follows the rise and fall of a young busboy Ditie Czech for child who, despite his diminutive stature, possesses big dreams and the determination to become a millionaire to be the equal of everyone else is influenced by his father s advice to have an aim in life because then he d Man s body and spirit are indestructiblehe is merely changed or metamorphized Bohumil Hrabal, I Served the King of England 1971.Hrabal s satirically political, erotically imagined and poignant adventure story follows the rise and fall of a young busboy Ditie Czech for child who, despite his diminutive stature, possesses big dreams and the determination to become a millionaire to be the equal of everyone else is influenced by his father s advice to have an aim in life because then he d have a reason for living, initiates his rise at the brothel Paradise a habit forming place that, from Ditie s innocent viewpoint, is so wonderful and forbidden that I wanted nothingin this world, because at last I d found a beautiful and noble aim.His adventures surrealistically course through farcical scenes of life in wartime Prague, though he stumbles upward without much thought to moral implications, idealizing and fervently learning from the distinguished headwaiter who knows everything about everything because, as the latter puts it I served the King of England. Ditie s steps to elevated stature are vividly imagined, particularly in one ironic episode where he effortlessly fumbles into serving the Emperor of Ethiopia, Hailie Selassie the similarity in their physical sizes is not lost on the reader I learned that feeling victorious makes you victorious, and that once you lose heart or let yourself be discouraged the feeling of defeat will stay with you for the rest of your life, and you ll never get back on your feet again, especially in your own country and your own surroundings, where you re considered a runt, an eternal busboyHrabal depicts scenes of the German Occupation of Czechoslovakia through Ditie s relationship with Lise, a Nazi gym instructor Their marriage is expected to help perpetuate the future Aryan pure blooded offspring of the Reich Hrabal s highly erotic treatment depicting Germany in the throes of swallowing up Czechoslovakia, of the latter forced to submission and, under pressure too, the ejaculation of its own identity proves this author s mastery of allegory The handicapped nature of Ditie s and Lise s child is another ironic, powerfully piercing twist of the dagger in Hitler s ideology.With Hrabal s signature taste for the absurd direction of Fate, his hero becomes the millionaire of his dreams but through the establishment of communism, loses that long sought for stature, along with the freedom he thought it would afford him.The final portions of Ditie s story are the most poignant, with a theme that the author often uses in his novels memories, self reflection, and the expectations of one s life Ditie becomes a road mender, and in his loneliness, he contemplates the direction he let his life take, coming to some profound conclusions of integrity and morality ..the maintenance of this road was the maintenance of my own life, which now, when I looked back on it, seemed to have happened to someone else My life at this point seemed like a novel, a book written by a stranger even though I alone had the key to it, I alone was a witness to it, even though my life too was constantly being overgrown by grass and weeds at either end But as I used a grub hoe and a shovel on the road, I used memory to keep the road of my life open into the past, so I could take my thoughts backward to where I wanted to begin rememberingand so arriving, in this back and forth way, at the meaning of life Not the meaning of what used to be or what happened a long time ago, but discovering the kind of road you d opened up and had yet to open up, and whether there was still time to attain the serenity that would secure you against the desire to escape from your own solitude, from the most important questions that you ask yourself. Hrabal s tragicomic tale of a nobody seeking to become important, and Czechoslovakia s pre WWII to its Communism period may be one and the same Ditie s introspective thoughts of his journey of interrogating, accusing, and defending himself and of finally moving forward, may be taken as reflective of Hrabal s beloved country This highly inventive, equally erotic, funny, tragic, philosophical and inspiring work deeply touched and entertained Just a word of caution, though..the movie was disappointing.Read May 15th, 2014

  3. says:

    I was actually trying to find another book by Hrabal Closely Watched Trains , but the library only had this I m glad I picked it up, as it was a joy to read from start to finish, and muchserious and thought provoking than the comedy of the first pages let me believe Probably, the book would not qualify as a hidden gem with a 4 rating from 4000 votes and an inclusion into one of those 1001 books to read before you die lists, but I still think it is underappreciated and worthy of I was actually trying to find another book by Hrabal Closely Watched Trains , but the library only had this I m glad I picked it up, as it was a joy to read from start to finish, and muchserious and thought provoking than the comedy of the first pages let me believe Probably, the book would not qualify as a hidden gem with a 4 rating from 4000 votes and an inclusion into one of those 1001 books to read before you die lists, but I still think it is underappreciated and worthy ofpraises and recognition than it has already received.Briefly, this is a picaresque adventure, following the tribulations of the busboy waiter Ditie in Bohemia, starting in the 1930 s through the World War and into the communist upheaval in the aftermath of the war First glimpsed as a crafty 14 y.o selling hamburgers to time pressed train travelers and conning them out of their money, we follow him through a series of jobs in luxurious hotels, culminating with a sumptuous soiree serving not the King of England, but Hailee Selassie the Emperor of Ethiopia A classic case of Napoleonic complex, Ditie s very short stature is constantly pushing him forward to prove himself and to demonstrate that he belongs, that he is as good, if not better than any of his colleagues and patrons His ultimate ambition is to become a hotel owner himself, serving the rich and famous and basking in the recognition of his peers Ditie s lack of scruples, amoral atitudes and self absorbtion might have turned me off towards him if it weren t for his exuberant zest for life, manifest in his early discovery and veneration of a woman s bodybreasts swinging like bells in a church tower, in the carefree throwing away of money on rich food, drinks and wild parties For me the book is a happy marriage between the rigorous Germanic pride in a job well done and impecable service with the wilder Slav streak that lives for the moment and swings often between extremes of joy and depression The closest analogy to the irreverent and whimsical style of Hrabal narration is coming from the movies think of an amalgam of Federico Fellini s wild carnivals, the early biting satire of Milos Forman, Emir Kusturica dancing to gypsy music on the edge of the abyss, the melancholy and the lust in Francois Truffaut or Giuseppe Tornatore mannish boys The inclusion of Bohumil Hrabal among these sacred monsters doesn t seem forced to me, as I consider his work every bit as accomplished and relevant of human dreams and desires.The title of the novel is both misleading and difficult to pin down As I already mentioned, Ditie doesn t actually service the King of England, yet the phrase comes to define his life, the turning point of his career, the eye opener and later the acceptance of his failures together with his successes The first to use the phrase is one of Ditie s mentors, Mr Skriv nek who considers waiting an art which, he says, involves a deep knowledge of human nature The payoff from these lessons and observations will come only when Ditie learns about pain and loss and the imminence of death, watching young men departing for the war, leaving their loved one behindI learned to see the countryside, the flowers on the tables, the children at play, and to see that every hour is a sacramentOther mentors in Ditie s waiting career will urge him to to keep his ears open without hearing, keep his eyes open without seeing He will be ready to recognize and profit from every opportunity, while maintaining a facade of discretion and detachment from his client s debauchery From a travelling salesman he learns about the true value of money, not in themselves but in the liberty of choices and in the hedonist delights they buy Easy come, easy go is another of those Balkanic angles that are familiar territory for me Losing everything can be a liberating step, or as we say around here, a kick in the behind is a step forwardTommorrow I would live for somewhere far away, far from people, though of course I knew there d be people there too, and I d always believed, like everyone else who works in artificial light, that one day I would get out of the city and into nature, that when I retired I would see what a forest really looked like, what the sun really looked like, the sun that has shoned into my face every day of my life, making me shield my eyes with a hat or a shadow When I was a waiter I used to love it when at least once a day all those doormen and superintendents and stokers would come out of their buildings, turn their faces upward, and from the abyss of the Prague streets gaze at the strip of sky overhead, at the clouds, to see what time really was, according to nature and not by the clock The politics don t play a very big role in the beginning of the novel, but as Ditie grows up he can no longer ignore the events that will directly affect his life the invasion of his native land while the woman he falls in love with is a Nazi activist, the atrocities against Jews in Poland that will provide him with the means to buy his dream hotel Lidice the village razed to the ground in revenge for partizan activity, the proud Aryan supermen returning crippled and empty eyed from the Russian front, the communist regime upsetting the social ladder that Ditie had tried so hard to climb The humorous overtones and the epicurean exploits never fully disappear from the landscape see a memorable late scene in an improvised prison , but the pain, the injustice and the futility of existence would mark the later journey of our picaresque hero I have chosen to interpret Ditie s final reiteration of the boast from the title, as him looking back at his life not in anger but with a clear eye, no regrets or excuses or moral lessons, not even any grandiose revelation about the meaning of life, just a bit of justifiable pride and a half smile at the folly and beauty of it allThe only right things were the things I enjoyed not the way children and drunks enjoy things, but the way the professor of French literature taught me, enjoyment that was metaphysical When you enjoy something, then you ve got it, you idiots, you evil, stupid, criminal sons of men, he would say, and he d browbeat us until he got us where he wanted us, open to poetry, to objects, to wonder, and able to see that beauty always points to infinity and eternity

  4. says:

    This is a highly regarded mid century novel by an acclaimed Czech writer that wasn t translated into English until late last century It tells the story of Ditie, an impoverished youth who starts work selling hot dogs in a train station and works his way up through the service industry as life around him is torn asunder by the second World War.I wasn t quite sure what to make of this novel at first, with its page long sentences, dearth of female characters and absurdist, fairy tale undertones B This is a highly regarded mid century novel by an acclaimed Czech writer that wasn t translated into English until late last century It tells the story of Ditie, an impoverished youth who starts work selling hot dogs in a train station and works his way up through the service industry as life around him is torn asunder by the second World War.I wasn t quite sure what to make of this novel at first, with its page long sentences, dearth of female characters and absurdist, fairy tale undertones But as I got deeper into the book, the innocent voice of the determined Ditie began to grow on me As he moved through the ranks of restaurant service, I also got caught up in the story of the German invasion as seen through the eyes of a Czech who had the luck misfortune to fall in love with a German nurse.Though buffeted on the winds of fate both good and bad, Ditie comes through it all with a remarkably clear eyed understanding of his place in history I closed the book with a great deal of affection for this wise fool of a character and the insights he shared about his unusual life

  5. says:

    Czech writer, Bohumil Hrabal, is a raconteur par excellence I Served the King of England is a highly entertaining story about how the unbelievable comes true many times over for Dit When we first make his acquaintance, he is only age 15 and a busboy at the Grand Prague Hotel The story follows Dit s colorful career in the hotel industry from busboy to waiter, to lead waiter and to hotel owner his sexual exploits his self awakening In essence, it is the story of Dit , a pint size man try Czech writer, Bohumil Hrabal, is a raconteur par excellence I Served the King of England is a highly entertaining story about how the unbelievable comes true many times over for Dit When we first make his acquaintance, he is only age 15 and a busboy at the Grand Prague Hotel The story follows Dit s colorful career in the hotel industry from busboy to waiter, to lead waiter and to hotel owner his sexual exploits his self awakening In essence, it is the story of Dit , a pint size man trying to find his way in the world and to gain respect The novel also offers glimpses of life in Czechslovakia before and after the German occupation in World War II I derived much pleasure from Hrabal s vivid depiction of the otherwise invisible operations behind buzzling hotels and the unimaginable cuisine lung in sour sauce, anyone served in their fancy restaurants The novel is uproariously funny for a good stretch and yet it is unsuspectingly profound in its observation of our human aspirations and needs.Hrabal s character caricatures are memorable and a joy to read I grew to love a few of the key waiters who are influential in mentoring Dit and honing his skills of observation view spoiler Chief among them is Mr Skrivanek, the lead waiter in Hotel Paris, who claims to have served the King of England There is the all seeing wheelchair bound boss who commandeers his staff manically with a whistle In the same Hotel Tichota is a giant porter who splits wood with melodic blows of his ax in the flood lit courtyard only when guests arrive The salesmen who dined and traded at the Grand Prague Hotel are a hoot There is the unforgettable red caped general, a big spending guest at Hotel Tichota, who vehemently derides every dish but consumes each with relish hide spoiler An intoxicating quality permeates Hrabal s prose and the settings that he paints There is a sense of wild abandon free spending gaiety and debauchery , a celebration of wealth and the frivolity of literally throwing money to the four winds The writing is cheeky, saucy, ribald Then the narrative takes on a sober and darker tone as it segues into the German occupation of Czechoslovakia Unpleasant events happen to Dit but the unbelievable also keeps coming true for him view spoiler The reader follows Dit through his marriage, his phenomenal success in realizing his dream to be a hotelier, the humbling discovery that wealth does not guarantee social acceptance or respect, his internment in a millionaire s prison after the communist takeover of Czechoslovakia, his enduring friendship with Zdenek the former Hotel Tichota head waiter turned politician , his solitary life in the mountains with a dog, a horse, a goat, and a cat that is all the family he has It is most gratifying that the Dit we meet at the end stands tall and is able to laugh at himself hide spoiler The novel is graced with many pleasing and touching episodes that merit re reading view spoiler The episode that stands out is the visit of the Emperor of Ethiopia to Hotel Paris and the feast of the stuffed camel that catapulted Dit to distinction, an honor that served him for the rest of his life There is an anecdote of a professor of French Literature teaching a frivolous young girl how to learn French and love books The Goodreads community will love what I thought is a fitting tribute to the humanizing and transformative power of literature hide spoiler Read I Served the King of England It exceeds expectations on many counts Five brilliant stars

  6. says:

    Great characters don t die take Svejk for example Last seen hunting mongrels to smuggle into the purebred boudoirs of gullible dowagers , he emerges, after a Van Winklian absence, in the novels and persona of Bohumil Hrabal, arguably central Europe s greatest pure novelist of the post WWII era by pure novelist here I mean something like what sportswriters mean when they describe a basketball player as a pure shooter or pure point guard nobility, heredity, mystical powers I Served the Great characters don t die take Svejk for example Last seen hunting mongrels to smuggle into the purebred boudoirs of gullible dowagers , he emerges, after a Van Winklian absence, in the novels and persona of Bohumil Hrabal, arguably central Europe s greatest pure novelist of the post WWII era by pure novelist here I mean something like what sportswriters mean when they describe a basketball player as a pure shooter or pure point guard nobility, heredity, mystical powers I Served the King of England is one of my favorite chapters in the Hrabalian human comedy a deeply loveable masterpiece It affirms without being coy and bubbles without being annoying, in part because B.H is never afraid of reminding us as Hasek liked to that his hero is an idiot Not someone masquerading as an idiot, but an actual idiot Does the trick sound familiar Quixote, Mishkin, Homer Simpson Well then number Hrabal where he belongs, among Davenport s secret Christians Kind of like Friar Tuck

  7. says:

    Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. I bought this book during my trip to Prague as part of my project to get a book or two in each new country I visit Now, this is not my first Czech book, but I wanted to try a new Czech author nevertheless.In my opinion, one of the best things about the book was actually the foreword Unfortunately, I don t have the book right now, so I can t mention the author of the foreword, but they wrote a very informative, interesting and engaging analysis of both Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. I bought this book during my trip to Prague as part of my project to get a book or two in each new country I visit Now, this is not my first Czech book, but I wanted to try a new Czech author nevertheless.In my opinion, one of the best things about the book was actually the foreword Unfortunately, I don t have the book right now, so I can t mention the author of the foreword, but they wrote a very informative, interesting and engaging analysis of both I Served the King of England , and Hrabal s literature in general Not knowing the author, it really helped me see some tendencies in his writing and in the themes he uses.The book itself was not exactly to my liking The story was rather interesting, but the atmosphere was very tight and suffocating The main character was such a narrow minded little man that his world was equally as small and claustrophobic His experiences, even the ones he was most proud of and most happy about, always had a pinch of wrongness and just this general feeling about something dirty and repulsive happening For example, as you can see in the cover of the book, he liked to put flowers in the pubic hair of the women he slept with But those women were either prostitutes, or his Nazi to the bone wife, and there was something very unpleasant and private about reading about his joy from this action.I feel like this is something that often happens in European literature, and especially that of the ex Communist countries While in American literature even murder and gore are kind of shiny in description, in European literature, there is this sense of the author wanting to create shock in the reader through showing the reality in the most vulgar way possible It is a thing I have always noticed in in every piece of art in Bulgaria be it literature, movies, paintings, there is always sex But it is not appealing, erotic sex It s always the kind of description of sex which makes you feel uncomfortable and in need of a hot shower and a lot of scrubbing.This is how I felt while reading this book And spoiler alert for my next Czech book The Joke, same thing there.One thing which was mentioned in the foreword of the book which I couldn t help but notice later on, was the fact that the character is always in need of proving himself and he is in a desperate need of attention and achieving every physical element of happiness and obtaining every material proof of success While in character he is a spineless worm, in aspiration, he wants, and even briefly manages, to be rich and famous.Setting everything about the story aside, Hrabal, undeniably, has a very good writing style The descriptions he uses are very poetical and thought through He guides the reader into his world and helps him see everything through exactly the right prism I knew for certain that this girl could never be happy, but that her life would be sadly beautiful, and that life with her would be both an agony and a fulfillment for a man

  8. says:

    This is one of the rare cases where I saw the movie well before I read the book In part, I think my reaction to the book is because of what I saw with movie Tracing the rise and fall of a busboy during the mid 1900s, I Served the King of England is a brew of humor, strangeness and beauty It is impossible, though the movie came very close to capture the absolute beauty of the language, even as it appears in translated form It s strange because it is the beauty of the language that possesses This is one of the rare cases where I saw the movie well before I read the book In part, I think my reaction to the book is because of what I saw with movie Tracing the rise and fall of a busboy during the mid 1900s, I Served the King of England is a brew of humor, strangeness and beauty It is impossible, though the movie came very close to capture the absolute beauty of the language, even as it appears in translated form It s strange because it is the beauty of the language that possesses the book, not any feeling toward the narrator who only really seems to become a member of the human race at the end, where he identifies with his animals But the language in this novel God, beautiful descriptions The reader can understand the attraction Perhaps, we are nothingthan animals after all Perhaps, we are nothingthan Napoleon Perhaps, we are nothingthan wisps, trying for something that we can t adequately or even logically describe Perhaps

  9. says:

    But I didn t want to be seen by human eyes any, or praised for what I d done all of that had left me226 I lived in Prague for almost seven years, from the age of nine to fourteen I was too young at the time to have a sense of Czech literature, of course, but I m trying to make up for it retrospectively by readingCzech authors aside from theobvious choice of Kundera This actually goes for the literatures of all the countries in which I ve lived sadly, I only startedBut I didn t want to be seen by human eyes any, or praised for what I d done all of that had left me226 I lived in Prague for almost seven years, from the age of nine to fourteen I was too young at the time to have a sense of Czech literature, of course, but I m trying to make up for it retrospectively by readingCzech authors aside from theobvious choice of Kundera This actually goes for the literatures of all the countries in which I ve lived sadly, I only started seriously reading when I came back to the Netherlands to study Anyway, this was my first encounter with Hrabal All in all it was a memorable novel I especially liked how he managed to condense significant elements of modern Czech history Sokolism, pre war anti German sentiments, WWII itself, post war communism in the life of a rather ordinary character The beginning and ending were strong and compelling, but there was a large part in the middle that left me unaffected, though But I ll definitely readby Hrabal his style was rather unique

  10. says:

    I don t read much fiction these days, but when I do, I often go for or back to Hrabal Even though Kundera is probably the best known Czech writer and another favorite Hrabal is considered the grandaddy They cover many of the same themes communism, relationships, sex but their styles couldn t bedifferent Hrabal reminds me of Hemingway via Bukowski short, boozy and punchy But he also mixes in a dream like quality, where implausible things are made to seem commonplace This was my I don t read much fiction these days, but when I do, I often go for or back to Hrabal Even though Kundera is probably the best known Czech writer and another favorite Hrabal is considered the grandaddy They cover many of the same themes communism, relationships, sex but their styles couldn t bedifferent Hrabal reminds me of Hemingway via Bukowski short, boozy and punchy But he also mixes in a dream like quality, where implausible things are made to seem commonplace This was my first read of Hrabal and probably still my favorite I ve read that much of what makes Hrabal so great is lost in the translation I ll never know but the english translation of I Served the King of England nails that dreamy chance happenings quality This book will make you start thinking about booking a trip to Prague

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